Creating impressions

I am keen to use knitted hats as a basis for exploring loss.

Knitting has such a variety of textures both within the stitching as well as the fabrics and fibres used.

Hats also reference protection, heads as a place where memories are made and mental stress is stored. Our head is where our brain is and the head is an important part of the skeleton in determining how osteologist discover details of the past.

Different patterns and styles suggest individuality, personal identity.

knitting

I started by exploring the impressions of different knitted swatches within clay…

knittingImpressionClay

Knitted strips of old bed sheets

knittingImpressionClay2 knittingImpressionClay3

Knitted torn curtain fabric strips

knittingImpressionClay4

Knitted leather from an old belt.

I particularly like the fact that you get a good impression of both the stitch and the fabric itself. The fabric imprints look rather like finger prints.

I also started to look at materials other than clay…

impressions

Knitting pressed into paper pulp in the foreground and knitting pressed into bone ash and salt solution. I liked the idea of bone ash with it’s connotations of death but the impression turned out too rough without definition even though it feels surprisingly solid.

impressions1

Compact_silk

Silk cocoon strippings compresses with tylose (I need a stronger container and more pressure)

Compact_HumanHair

Human Hair with tylose.

compressedHoover

Waste from the hoover compressed with just water added. I threw this away because it was a bit grim but interesting that it did compress well but didn’t hold the impression pressed into it.

I wanted to explore the possibility of our waste as a memory of our presence.

compressedHoover2

PaperPulpImpression1

Knitting impression within paper pulp

PaperPulpImpression

Less defined knitting impression within paper pulp.

The texture and definition of the knitting pattern is really important! Also yarn is possibly too squashy to get a strong impression. A feint impression does though add to the sense of a fading memory.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s